‘Hell Hole’ Shiraz

The ‘Hell Hole’ label was inspired by the severe drought conditions of the 2003 vintage. The word Pokol (as in Pokolbin) means purgatory or hell in Hungarian and it is believed many an early settler to the area were taken aback by the extreme climatic conditions they faced with temperatures that can range between freezing and 50°c.

Download pdf

2016

Region: Hunter Valley

Alcohol: 13.5%

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area. ‘Pokol’ directly translates to ‘Hell’, and ‘ben’ to ‘in’. An undeniable reference to the hot, dry and sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45º C during Pokolbin summers.

Fruit source: Old-vine Shiraz from the 1960’s planted ’Homestead’ vineyard owned by the Kindred family. ’Homestead’ is situated at the western end of Palmers Lane in Pokolbin.

Fermentation: The hand picked fruit was fermented in two tonne open vats and then transferred into French oak hogsheads of which 30% were new.

Maturation: After 16 months oak maturation, the wine was then bottled with minimum filtration.

Winemaker’s comments: With far too much rainfall in 2015 to release a ‘Hell Hole’ Shiraz, or ‘Terracotta’ and ‘Alexander Munro’ for that matter, 2016 was a welcome relief. Not a completely trouble free vintage, but more typical and quite manageable. The old-vines again
proving their worth.

Tasting note: A bright crimson in colour; strong aroma of ripe blackberries, plums and mocha. The palate is a little more than medium—bodied in richness, but in perfect balance and the tannins and acid are in harmony.

Cellaring estimate: Medium to long term. 20+ years.

Suggested food match: Beef based cuisine or aged hard cheese.

2014

2014 Hell Hole Shiraz - FSRegion: Hunter Valley

Alcohol: 14.0%

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area. ‘Pokol’ directly translates to ‘Hell’, and ‘ben’ to ‘in’. An undeniable reference to the hot, dry and sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45º C during Pokolbin summers.

Fruit source: Old-vine Shiraz from the 1960’s planted ’Leonard Estate’ vineyard owned by Mike Worthington was again the fruit source for the 2014 vintage. The ‘Leonard Estate’ is situated at the western end of Palmers Lane in Pokolbin.

Fermentation: The hand picked fruit was fermented in two tonne open vats and then transferred into French oak hogsheads of which 40% were new.

Maturation: After 16 months oak maturation, the wine was then bottled with minimum filtration.

Winemaker’s comments: 2014 is being acclaimed as the best Hunter Valley (red) vintage in 50 years with references back to the legendary 1965 wines. It is certainly the best we have seen across all levels since 1991.

Tasting note: A bright crimson in colour; aromas of blueberries and blackberries with a mild aromatic lift. The medium—bodied palate is flavour rich and has perfect balance, seamless tannins and great persistence on the palate. One of our best.

Cellaring estimate: Medium to long term. 20+ years.

Suggested food match: Beef based cuisine or aged hard cheeses to finish a meal.

2013

2013-Hell-Hole-Shiraz[1]Wine Notes

Region: Hunter Valley

Alcohol: 13.5%

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area. ‘Pokol’ directly translates to ‘Hell’, and ‘ben’ to ‘in’. An undeniable reference to the hot, dry and sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45º C during Pokolbin summers.

Fruit source: Old-vine Shiraz from the 1960’s planted ’Leonard Estate’ vineyard owned by Mike Worthington was the fruit source for the 2013 vintage. The ‘Leonard Estate’ is situated at the western end of Palmers Lane in Pokolbin.

Fermentation: The hand picked fruit was fermented in two tonne open vats and then transferred into French oak hogsheads of which 45% were new.

Maturation: AAfter 20 months oak maturation, the wine was then bottled with minimum filtration.

Winemaker’s comments: With no red wines made from the 2012 Hunter Valley vintage, 2013 was eagerly awaited and although the yields were small, the quality was very good to excellent. Nearly on par with wines of the 2011 vintage and will also age very well.

Tasting note: Deep garnet with crimson tinges in colour; aromas of ready to pick blackberries and dark chocolate on the nose. The classy medium-bodied palate has perfect balance, poise and intensity completed by great persistence on the palate.

Cellaring estimate: Medium to long term. 15+ years.

Suggested food match: Beef based cuisine or aged hard cheeses to finish a meal.

What the experts say:

““If, like me, you’re a fan of traditional – dare I say “old fashioned” – Hunter Valley “burgundy”, you’ll bloody love this. Like some of the great old Hunter Shirazes of the past, this single vineyard wine has enormously wild, earthy, animal complexity: it tastes like ripe squashed blood plums rolled in red dusty soil and drizzled with the pan juices from a rib eye roast. Yum.”

Max Allen – The Australian – 6th April 2015

Old vine fruit fermented in open vats, then matured in French oak (45% new) for 20 months. Rhys Eather obviously recognised the potential of the grapes early on in the piece when allocating the amount of new oak; you can see it, but it’s tightly surrounded by the clasp of intense blackberry, earthy fruits; its tannins strengthen that clasp, but not brutally.

Rated 95. James Halliday – 2016 Australian Wine Companion

2011

HHS-2011[1]Wine Notes

Region: Hunter Valley

Alcohol: 13.5%

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area and means ’hot as hell’ or ’hell hole’, referring to the hot, dry and sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45º C.

Fruit source: Old-vine Shiraz from the 1960’s planted ’Leonard Estate’ vineyard owned by Mike Worthington was the fruit source for the 2011 vintage.

Fermentation: The hand picked fruit was fermented in two tonne open vats and then transferred into French oak hogsheads of which 40% were new.

Maturation: After 22 months oak maturation, the wine was then bottled with minimum filtration.

Winemaker’s comments: 2011 was an exceptional Hunter Valley vintage, particularly for Shiraz. The months of January through March were very dry and warm, perfect conditions for Shiraz. The old-vine ‘Leonard Estate’ vines performed particularly well with a moderate crop of wonderful fruit.

Tasting note: 2011 was an exceptional Hunter Valley vintage, particularly for Shiraz. The months of January through March were very dry and warm, perfect conditions for Shiraz. The old-vine ‘Leonard Estate’ vines performed particularly well with a moderate crop of wonderful fruit.

Cellaring estimate: Medium to long term. 15+ years.

Suggested food match: Aged hard cheeses

What the experts say:

“Sourced from nigh-on 50-year-old vines from the Leonard Vineyard; open-fermented; 22 months in French hogsheads (30% new). Vivid crimson-purple, this medium to full-bodied wine is all class; black fruits framed by Hunter Valley leather and earth, and French oak; excellent tannins. Will be exceptionally long-lived”.

Rating 96

James Halliday – 2015 Wine Companion

Deep garnet-purple in color the 2011 Hell Hole Shiraz has an intense nose of blackberry preserves, blackcurrant cordial and dried plums with hints of fertile earth, charcoal and underbrush. Medium to full-bodied, it gives and very good concentration of earthy black fruit flavors framed by rounded tannins and balanced acidity before finishing long. Drink it now to 2019+.

Rated : 91+

Lisa Perrotti-Brown – The Wine Advocate #213 – Jun 2014

2010

HHS-2010[1]Wine Notes

Region: Hunter Valley

Alcohol: 13.5%

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area and means ’hot as hell’ or ’hell hole’, referring to the hot, dry and sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45º C.

Fruit source: Old-vine Shiraz from the Lindemans owned ‘Ben Ean’ vineyard was the fruit source for the 2010 vintage.

Fermentation: The fruit, including 30% with stems was fermented in open vats and then transferred into French oak hogsheads of which 40% were new .

Maturation: After 20 months oak maturation, the wine was then bottled with minimum filtration in December 2011.

Winemaker’s comments: The 2010 vintage was punctuated by seasonal rain but the ‘Ben Ean’ vineyard was ripe early and the Shiraz fruit was picked at optimum phenological ripeness and clean as a whistle!!

Tasting note: A vivid crimson in colour with strong aromas of plum, blueberries and dark chocolate on the nose. The medium bodied palate has a great depth of flavour of dark forest berries, accompanied by well managed spicy French oak. The tannins are fine and rounded resulting in a long balanced finish.

Cellaring estimate: Medium to long term. 15+ years.

Suggested food match: Red meat based cuisine.

What the experts say:

“Crimson-purple; luscious black fruits, with a hint of licorice, are swathed in a silky web of oak and tannins; has great mouthfeel to a long, medium-bodied palate. Screwcap.”

Rated: 94

James Halliday – Wine Companion – 3rd October 2012

“Deep garnet in color, the 2010 Hell Hole Shiraz opens with intense notes of freshly crushed plums and blackberries with touches of anise, Szechuan pepper, Provence herbs and loam. Medium-bodied, the palate gives tons of expressive peppered black fruit flavors, crisp acidity and a medium to firm, finely-grained tannin structure through the long finish. Approachable now, drink it to 2019+. “

91 / 100

The Wine Advocate #207 – Lisa Perotti-Brown

2009

HHS-2009[1]Wine Notes

Region: Hunter Valley

Alcohol: 13.5%

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area and means ’hot as hell’ or ’hell hole’, referring to the hot, dry and  sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45º C.

Fruit source: As with the previous four vintages, this is made from fruit harvested off a north facing block on the low yielding, 40 year-old Howard family’s “Somerset” vineyard in Pokolbin.

Fermentation: The fruit, including 30% with stems was fermented in open vats and then transferred into French oak hogsheads.

Maturation: After 20 months oak maturation, the wine was then bottled with  minimum filtration in September 2010.

Winemaker’s comments: The early ripening ‘Howard Vineyard’ missed the major rains of 2009 and once again delivered high quality Shiraz fruit for the ‘Hell Hole’ label.

Tasting note: Bright crimson in colour with aromas of plum, licorice and spice on the nose. The medium-bodied palate has  a good depth of flavour of red and dark berries, supported by moderate French oak. The tannins are fine and rounded resulting in a long seamless finish.

Cellaring estimate: Medium to long term. 15 years.

Suggested food match: Red meat dominant recipies.

What the experts say:

“Crimson-purple; the bouquet has plum and blackberry fruit, the palate following suit with dark berry fruit, and a hint of regional earth, and firm, although ripe, tannins.”

Rated: 94

James Halliday – 2012 Wine Companion

2007

HHS-2007[1]Wine Notes

Region: Hunter Valley

Alcohol: 13.5%

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area and means ’hot as hell’ or ’hell hole’, referring to the hot, dry and  sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45º C.

Fruit source: As with the previous four vintages, this is made from fruit harvested off a north facing block on the low yielding, 40 year-old Howard family’s “Somerset” vineyard in Pokolbin.

Fermentation: The fruit, including 30% with stems was fermented in open vats and then transferred into French oak hogsheads

Maturation: After 19 months oak maturation, the wine was then bottled with  minimum filtration in September 2008.

Winemaker’s comments: 2007 in many respects was a near perfect Hunter Valley red vintage. Very low yields on the back of the very hot 2006 vintage were allowed problem free ripening with only minor storm activity towards harvest. What we love about the old Howard vines is that despite this heat and ongoing drought, they gave us    perfectly ripe fruit at a very low baume by current standards.

Tasting note: Deep crimson in colour; aromas of blackberries, plums, licorice, earth and spice on the nose. The palate is medium-bodied but very flavoursome with a core of plum fruit. Ripe, silky tannins combine with the fruit for a very long finish.

Cellaring estimate: Medium to long term. 10 years.

Suggested food match: Medium rare scotch fillet.

What the experts say:

“Blackberries and raspberries, spice and a little sappiness with latent liquorice richness and quality vanilla oak.It’s rich and spicy but only just medium bodied, lithe rather than heavy with firm fine tannins and no shortage of length. Classic Hunter Shiraz from a top vintage.”

95 Points.

Gary Walsh – The Wine Front – September 2009

“Such was the supreme ripeness of 2007 that 20-25% stalks were included in the ferment of the 2007 Meerea Park Hell Hole Shiraz. It was matured in larger French oak format, hogsheads and puncheons, for 20-21 months, 30-40% new. It gives a deep garnet color leading to spicy, peppery, warm blackberry and blueberry aromas with some anise, underbrush, cardamom and a noticeable waft of cedar. Violets come through after a few minutes. Clean, pure, medium bodied, it is very spicy on the palate with finely grained tannins of a medium level. Elegant. Long finish. Drink 2012 to 2018. “
93 Points.

Lisa Perrotti-Brown MW – The Wine Advocate # 188 – April 2010

“Meerea Park ‘Hell Hole’ Hunter Valley Shiraz 2007: As with its brother (Terracotta) it has the hunter earthy nose and immediately releases savoury flavours those flavours go deep and last long the whole effect in the mouth is a wonderful sensation. I found it more forward (slightly) then Terracotta therefore more enjoyable to drink now and worth a point more as well 94 also worth $50.”

Tony Keys – Key Report of Wine #27 – 30th April 2010

“Good hue; the fruit aromas and flavours are led by blackberry, with plum and a touch of spice in support; the medium-bodied palate has impeccable balance, and all the wine needs is a few more years to soften and open up.”

Rating 94

James Halliday – 2011 Australian Wine Companion

2006

HHS-2006[1]Wine Notes

Region: Hunter Valley

Alcohol: 13.5%

Seal: Screwcap

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area and means ’hot as hell’ or ’hell hole’, referring to the hot, dry and sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45ºC.

Fruit Source: As with the previous three vintages, this is made from fruit harvested off a north facing block on the low yielding, 40 year-old Howard family’s “Somerset” vineyard in Pokolbin.

Fermentation & Maturation: The fruit was fermented in open vats and then transferred into French oak hogsheads and matured for 18 months, then bottled with minimum filtration in November 2007.

Winemakers Comments: 2006 was a very hot Hunter Valley vintage with 47ºC recorded on New Years Day. What we love about the old Howard vines is that despite this heat and ongoing drought, they gave us perfectly ripe fruit at a very low baume by current standards.

Deep crimson in colour; aromas of blackberries, plums, earth and spice on the nose. The palate is medium-bodied but very flavoursome with a core of plum fruit. The silky tannins combine with the fruit for a very long finish with near perfect balance.

Cellaring: Medium to long term. 10 years.

What the experts say:

“I liked this wine so much that I felt like a better person the moment I started drinking it. It’s perfumed and musky and outrageously plummy, its earthy, spicy foundations evident, but discreet. A fine flourish of scented flavour bursts through the finish; as do superfine tannins. Wow. Classic Hunter, in the best possible way. Drink 2012—2020.
96 Points.

Campbell Mattinson—The Big Red Wine Book—May 2008

“Two tastings of this now, one in February and one a couple of days ago, and both times I’ve scribbled in a 94-95 point range. The first tasting was amongst its siblings (Alexander Munro and Aunts) and the second amongst its peers (Graveyard and KISS).

It’s aromatic and fresh with berries, plum, spice, a bit of earthiness and some liquorice richness coming through with a bit of airing – quite Rhôney even. Again the theme is replayed on the palate – medium bodied, bright and very lively with refreshing acidity, fine lightly grippy tannins and a real sense of vigour throughout. It has flavours of plum, spice and earth with a deft application of tasteful malty oak and a very long dry finish. Serious and stylish but really needing a bit of cellar time to show its best.”

94+ Points.

Gary Walsh – Winorama – 26th May 2008

“This is a poised, taut Hunter shiraz, which is ready to pounce, but demands a long time in the cellar to really come out of itself. When it does, its elegant black fruits, spice and fine , minerally tannins will confirm it as one of the greats in the Meerea Park cellar”.

93 Points.

Tyson Stelzer – Wine Business Monthly 100 – August 2008

“This top-flight bottling delivers ripe dark berries and plum fruits, some lighter fragrant notes too; attractive and clean. Plenty of dark earthy complexity and oak spice in the mouth, medium-weight; dry dusty tannins dig in through the finish, dropping a wake of savoury liquorice complexity and dark minerals”.
Score 94.

Nick Stock – 2009 Penguin Good Australian Wine Guide

“A beautifully made shiraz which is fragrant and spicy, yet has just enough of the classic regional tilled earth character to beguile the taster. The flavours are rich and long on a firm but balanced palate thats begs for time.”

Winewise – Australia’s Great Shiraz Wines – April 2009

“Deep, but bright colour; voluminous shiraz fruit aromas and flavours are supported by positive tannins; long range proposition and will reward.”
Rating 93.

James Halliday – 2010 Australian Wine Companion

2005

HHS-2005[1]Wine Notes

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area and means ‘hot as hell’ or ‘hell hole’, referring to the hot, dry and sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45º C.

Fruit Source: The wine is made from fruit harvested off a north facing block on the low yielding. 39 year old Howard family’s “Somerset” vineyard in Pokolbin.

Fermentation & Maturation: The fruit was fermented in open vats and then pressed into French oak hogsheads and matured for 18 months. The wine was then bottled with minimum filtration. Because of this, over time a harmless crust may appear in the bottle.

Winemakers Comments: 2005 is a superb Hunter red vintage and one of the best we have seen at Meerea Park in our 16 years. The wines have the fruit power of the famed 2003 vintage but also have wonderfully soft tannins that make them very balanced and highly drinkable upon release. This softness should not inhibit their cellaring capability.

Deep crimson in colour; aromas of blackberries, cherries and vanilla spice on the nose. The very long, medium bodied palate shows the same as the nose with more cherry, blackberry and creamy vanilla oak and is superbly balanced with everything where it should be. The best ‘Hell Hole’ Shiraz release to date.

Cellaring: Medium to long term. 10 years .

What the experts say:

“Meerea Park Hell Hole Shiraz 2005 ($55): Juicy and perfumed and delicious – and unmistakably Hunter. It’s earthy, cherried and beautifully balanced, the oak far in the background. Hints of earthen game, and volatile acidity, are detectable, but minute. The fruit here has a glossy, polished, luminous shine to it, and the more I look at it the more I adore it. This wine is aromatic and divine. It is a mediumbodied wine that I would love to become acquainted with, often. It’s an outstanding example of old school, top quality Hunter shiraz”. Drink: 2009-2017.

95 points. 

Campbell Mattinson – The Wine Front – www.winefront.com.au – April 2007.

“I know most commentators prefer the 05 Alexander Munro (Lincoln included) to this wine but I’ll stand my ground and plant my flag firmly in the medium bodied Hunter earth. Some things are worth standing up for (every now and then mind ) and this wine is a beauty. Aromas of blackberry, ripe cherry, pepper, earth, violets and toasty vanilla oak. On the palate medium to full bodied with rich ripe blackberry, sweet cherry, vanilla cream, spice and more earthy flavours. It has a super supple texture with magnificent creamy tannins and enormous length of flavour. Everything in place for a classic cellaring style although it is so well balanced you might have difficulty keeping your hands off it”.

Rated : 96 Points.

Gary Walsh – Winorama – www.winorama.com.au – May 2007.

“The Eather brothers, Rhys and Garth, have a family tradition in Hunter winemaking stretching back to the mid-19th century but their wines are very much at the forefront of modern Hunter style. This 100 per cent shiraz is based on specific vineyards, and is a bright, ripe-fruit style with a lick of nicely handled oak. All Meerea park shirazes are at the more powerful end of Hunter style”.

Huon Hooke – SMH Good Living – 4th March 2008

“A silky, fluid mouthfeel, with undulations of red fruits and supple tannins; though only light to medium-bodied, has all the flavour one could wish for. To 2020.”
Rating 94

James Halliday – 2009 Wine Companion

2004

HHS-2004[1]Wine Notes

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area and means ‘hot as hell’ or ‘hell hole’, referring to the hot, dry and sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45º C.

Fruit Source: The wine is made from fruit harvested off a north facing block on the low yielding. 38 year old Howard family’s “Somerset” vineyard in Pokolbin.

Fermentation & Maturation: The fruit was fermented in open vats and then pressed into French oak hogsheads and matured for 2 years. The wine was then bottled mid 2006 with minimum filtration. Because of this, over time a harmless crust may appear in the bottle.

Winemakers Comments: 2004 was a typical Hunter vintage in that it has produced medium bodied wines with red berry fruit characteristics. It was this style that led early Hunter winemakers to adopt the “Burgundy” moniker for their wines. Modern viticultural practices and winemaking has eradicated the faults that plagued many early wines leaving the fruit to do the talking.

Bright crimson in colour. Sweet mulberry and raspberry dominates the nose. The spicy French oak has integrated well and not obvious. The palate is lush, silky and long, with fine tannins. Modern Hunter.

Cellaring: Medium to long term. 10+ years.

Selected for QANTAS 1st Class International service in 2007.

What the experts say:

“Aromas of blackberry, spice, jersey caramel, licorice and smokey bacon. Good fruit and clever oak treatment here. On the palate this is medium to full bodied with flavours of blackberry, mulberry, dried herbs, earth and savoury bacony oak. I like the tannins – they are grainy and grippy but sit comfortably within the wine. Dry savoury finish that encourages the next mouthful. A very classy Rhone meets Hunter style – a Rhunter if you like – and it drinks beautifully right now”.

93 Points

Gary Walsh – www.winorama.com.au – July 2006

“There is some reductive notes upon opening but these float off with time in the glass to reveal deep-set, muscular blackcurrant, black cherry and satsuma plum fruit with raspberry lift…ohhh it’s spicy too … exotically so with star anise and five spice, clove oil, licorice, mahogony, tar, dubbin and ‘Old Jamacian’ chocolate … it’s a pretty gutsy nose … brooding, smoky and deep. In the mouth the wine is medium to full-bodied and the concentrated blackcurrant, mulberry and dark plum fruit carries a light floral flick before it cuts a spicy, tarry swathe across the palate…..the tannins are long, ripe and fine in grain, the acidity bright and the finish lingers with a spicy, smoky exit….terrific stuff and a distinctly modern Hunter shiraz that is going places fast”.

93 Points

Dave Brookes – www.vinosense.com.au – July 2006

“The Meerea Park boys are really turning out some rippers. This is as good as the excellent 2003, and may even age out better. The tannins are assertive and extractive but the fruit’s up to the fight, with gorgeously earthen, licoricey, cherried, cedary ripeness roaming through delicious flavours of ham hock and spice. It looks very raw and young, as it should do, and should look great in ten years”. Drink: 2007-2019.

94 points

Campbell Mattinson – The Wine Front – 4th August 2006

“A spicy, oak-driven red made by Rhys Eather, with a nutmeg nose, smoke and dried bay leaf. A bigger style Hunter shiraz. Nice depth of flavour and richness, fleshy and balanced, and still building regional character. 92 Points.

AGT Wine Magazine – Top 100 New Releases – Feb/Mar 2007.

“Medium red – purple; an elegant, medium- bodied wine; good texture and structure; plum, cherry and blackberry fruit, with fine tannins. Has soaked up the French oak in which it spent 2 years; 150 dozen made”.
Rating 94.

James Halliday – 2008 Wine Companion

2003

HHS-2003[1]Wine Notes

Background: The name Pokolbin as legend has it, is derived from the early Hungarian migrant settlers to the area and means ‘hot as hell’ or ‘hell hole’, referring to the hot, dry and sometimes inhospitable summers that regularly top 45º C.

2003 is the first release of this label which is inspired by the severe drought conditions.

Fruit Source: The wine is made from fruit harvested off the low yielding. 37 year old Howard family’s “Somerset” vineyard in Pokolbin.

Fermentation & Maturation: The fruit was fermented in open vats and then pressed into French oak hogsheads and matured for 24 months. The wine was then bottled in March 2005 with minimum filtration. Because of this, over time a harmless crust may appear in the bottle.

Winemakers Comments: We experimented and went away from our usual use of barriques (225 litre) and matured this wine in French hogsheads (300 litre), of which 50% were new. The use of larger oak allowed longer time in barrel to soften the tannins. The resulting wine has dark berry fruit intensity, but remains elegant and soft which is what Hunter Shiraz is renowned for.

The dense drought vintage fruit has soaked up the oak perfectly to make a well balanced, seamless Shiraz.

Cellaring: Medium to long term. 12+ years

What the experts say:

“A very black purple colour. It smells fantastic offering up aromas of blackberry and cassis, new leather, licorice, smokehouse and vanilla. On the palate a very dense wine that is packed with smooth ripe tannins and flavours of dark cherry, blackberry and savoury smoky oak. Although it is thick, muscular and concentrated it is also beautifully balanced and very sophisticated. Finished very long and dry. In many ways it reminds me of a top flight Northern Rhone…a mini La La if you like. This is benchmark Australian Shiraz from a classic Hunter vintage. Buy it. You must.

96 points

Gary Walsh – Winorama – October 2005.

“It was matured in French Hogsheads, 50% of which was new, and that time in larger oak has done it wonders. It’s concentrated and brutish, but soft and stylish too, with clovey, cedary, high-gloss notes to exquisite plum and cherry earth. This has all the makings of a classic Hunter Shiraz, and given time should mature into exactly that. Drink: 2010-2017

94 points

Campbell Mattinson – Winefront Monthly Oct/Nov 2005

“Top 25 Wines Of The Year”

Campbell Mattinson – Collected Reviews 2005

Runner – up “Red Wine Of The Year 2005”

John Lewis-Newcastle Herald-January 2006

“Slightly more advanced colour (than the Alexander Munro); quite focused and intense black fruits; good structure and length. Screwcap. 14.5% alc.

Rating 94 Drink 2015.

James Halliday-2007 Australian Wine Companion.

Meerea Park Wines | Copyright 2017 | All rights reserved | Design by Videre Graphic | Website Constructed by xyntech